8 Ways to Combat Objections

A proponent of evidence can counter anticipated objections with a motion in limine before trial starts, but usually counsel counters objections to evidence after the opponent objects at trial. Here are eight ways to do it. Continue reading

How to Object Without Being Objectionable

thinkstockphotos-85449217-1How do you object in trial without being objectionable to the jury? Perhaps it’s impossible: A jury naturally resents the attorney who constantly leaps up and breaks the flow of information. But there are a few ways to make yourself less objectionable to the jury. Continue reading

What’s a Timely Objection?

clock_92572588Objections to evidence at trial must be “timely made.” Evid C §353(a). But what does that actually mean? Continue reading

Know Trial Objections Cold

185468074Making objections is a key skill for every trial attorney. The more you try cases, the more rote they become. But if you’re relatively new to the courtroom, or it’s been a while since you’ve been there, here’s a system for memorizing possible objections and having them at the tip of your tongue at trial. Continue reading

Refreshing Recollection in Court

469708075It’s common for witnesses forget facts while testifying—often due to nerves and sometimes due to selective memory. The good news is that you can use almost any item to refresh a witness’s recollection. Continue reading

Object with Care During Closing

57280160Attorneys have a lot of latitude in making their closing argument, but there are nonetheless impermissible arguments during closing and thus openings for opposing counsel to object. Even if you’re right, objecting during a closing may not be a smart move. Continue reading

Avoid Using Trial Objections When Defending a Deposition

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The following is a guest blog post by Micha Star Liberty. Micha represents plaintiffs in cases involving unlawful employment practices, personal injury and mass tort, defective products, civil rights, discrimination, antitrust violations, and consumer protection. She has offices in San Francisco and Oakland.

If you’re defending your client’s deposition and you have a problem with some of the questions the other attorney is asking, you’ll likely be tempted to object, as you do in court. But remember that there are different rules for objections in court versus in a deposition. Continue reading

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