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This Is How Interrogatories and Depositions Compare

When deciding whether to use interrogatories or depositions in discovery, there are several things to compare. Continue reading

Lessons from Trump’s Depo: Come Prepared!

In his 2007 deposition in his suit against a reporter, Donald Trump encountered very prepared attorneys. As the Washington Post describes, they “confronted the mogul with his past statements—and with his company’s internal documents, which often showed those statements had been incorrect or invented.” Regardless of your politics or personal feelings, Trump’s deposition presents an excellent example of how to effectively cross-examine an adverse witness in a deposition. Continue reading

Timing Your Requests for Admission

ThinkstockPhotos-487826116 (1)One of many tactical decisions you need to make in litigation is when to serve requests for admission. Timing may be key to getting what you need. Continue reading

How Can Someone Be Deposed Twice in the Same Case?

ThinkstockPhotos-501707257Generally, you can’t compel someone to attend a deposition if he or she has been previously deposed in the same case. But there are 5 exceptions to this rule. Continue reading

Size Up Your Adversary

ThinkstockPhotos-494299501When it comes to litigating a case, your client’s objectives are only half the story. If you want to gain an advantage, you’ll also need to successfully assess your adversary’s goals, capabilities, and willingness to fight. Continue reading

6 Things to Know About Interrogatory Responses

ThinkstockPhotos-158217439So, you’ve been hit with interrogatories. Before you start working on responses, review these 6 points. Continue reading

Are Requests for Admissions a Magic Bullet or Overblown?

466464237Requests for admission are one of the best techniques to create admissible evidence for summary judgment and trial. Every litigator should understand the advantages of using them but also their limitations. Continue reading

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