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5 Things to Include in Every Estate Plan

So you’ve gathered the client’s data—personal and financial—and know the client’s objectives. What do you do? Here are 5 typical documents you’ll need for the estate plan. Continue reading

Protecting Digital Assets: 6 Steps to Take on Death or Incapacity

ThinkstockPhotos-174474186It used to be enough for a fiduciary and her attorney to simply search through a decedent’s or incapacitated person’s papers in his or her workplace and at home, watch the mailbox for a 90 day cycle, and review tax returns and account statements. Things are more complicated now and a fiduciary must take several more immediate steps with regard to digital assets. Continue reading

Estate Planning Is Not Just for the Rich and Famous

178889857The following is a guest blog post by April E. Frisby of Frisby Law. April is a lawyer in Orange County who practices business and securities transactional law, as well as estate planning. April is also an adjunct law professor at Whittier Law School.

It can be hard to get folks to think about estate planning—especially the younger ones in the beginning stages of their careers. They believe that there will be many changes in their life before end-of-life planning becomes necessary or they think they don’t have enough money to worry about it. Or, perhaps most risky, they think they can just pick up a form at a stationary store or print it from a website and they’ll be all set. Hopefully the following points will help you convince folks that they need your expertise to get an estate plan in place now! Continue reading

Liening on Your Client to Get Paid

paid_153765184Do you know about charging liens? You should, because they can make all the difference to you getting paid for your attorney fees and costs. Continue reading

Who’s Got the Power (of Attorney Papers)?

So, you finally get around to preparing and signing powers of attorney for health care, personal care, and financial management. Now, where should you keep them? Should they be at your home? In a safe deposit box? At your attorney’s office? What’s the point of preparing these important documents if you don’t have them when you really need them? Continue reading

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