4 Steps to Deciding How and When to Present Evidence

Your objective is to determine how and when to present each witness, exhibit, and other item of evidence most persuasively during trial. The key to meeting this objective is breaking it down into these four steps. Continue reading

Say It Early and Often

78724287The most important concept to remember in organizing your statements to the jury, whether during opening statement or closing argument, is the “rule of primacy”: Jurors tend to believe what they hear first and most frequently. Continue reading

4 Tips to Get the Jury Excited About Your Expert

thinkstockphotos-537972277Don’t treat the qualification of your expert as a mere formality. The expert’s qualifications should convince jurors that they’re fortunate to have someone as qualified as the expert to assist them in deciding the case and that your expert is better qualified than the opposing one. Continue reading

Don’t Let Your Witness Look Like a Liar

noseJurors have been bombarded with information about “body language.” This information is joined by common folklore about tell-tale signs of falsehood. Here are five things to practice with your witnesses to keep their body language consistent with their truthful testimony.

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Gear Your Oral Presentations to All Types of Learners

ThinkstockPhotos-465171079There are few oral presentations given today that don’t make use of visual aids. It helps with the inevitable attention wandering and it allows you to reach different types of learners. Always try to make your presentations—including opening statements and closing arguments—memorable for all of your listeners. Continue reading

3 Ways to Improve Trial Pacing

78724287One of the cornerstones in trying a good case is pacing. The attorney who proves everything proves nothing. It’s imperative that your case be pared down to its essential elements and presented concisely. Continue reading

Expert Tip: Use Jury Instructions in Your Opening and Closing

78724287By the time you prepare your opening statement, you’ll know specifically what the legal theories of your case are and generally what the jury instructions will be. By the time of your closing argument, the instructions will have been settled. Make sure to plan your opening and closing with the jury instructions in mind. Continue reading

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