New Year, New Laws for Employment Lawyers

thinkstockphotos-498422290Were you able to keep track of the new legislative changes that will affect California employers and employment lawyers? Don’t worry, we did and here’s an overview of some of the key statutory changes you need to know about. Continue reading

Job Interview Questions: Steer Clear of Sex Identity and Sexual Orientation

140155267There are some interview or application questions that might elicit information that could get an employer into legal hot water if used to make an employment decision. Questions that touch on sex identity and sexual orientation should be off-limits. Here are some acceptable and unacceptable questions to help employers avoid problems in this area. Continue reading

Heads Up Employers: New Law Limits Use of E-Verify

interview_80608276The following is a guest blog post by James C. Anderson of Triebsch & Frampton, APC, in Turlock, California. Mr. Anderson practices in the areas of labor law, employment law for management, business transactions, and civil litigation. 

Many California employers use the federal electronic employment verification system, better known as E-Verify, to validate whether the employees they hire are authorized to work in the United States. E-Verify has been a relatively easy and low-risk verification system to use, but that may change with a new law that penalizes the use of E-Verify to check the employment authorization status of someone who hasn’t been offered employment.  Continue reading

Should You Check a Job Applicant’s Social Media Posts?

178161035Employers are wondering whether browsing public social media sites to learn more about a job applicant is worth the potential risks. A CareerBuilder survey found that 39% of employers use social networking sites to research job candidates, but do the other 61% have good reasons to stay away?  Continue reading

Anti-Retaliation Protections in the FLSA Don’t Apply to Job Applicants

The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), which was intended by Congress to govern the employment relationship, does not cover job applicants. At least, that was the conclusion the Fourth Circuit recently reached in a case of first impression at the federal appellate level. Continue reading