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Should Employers Use Intelligence and Personality Tests in Hiring?

When vetting job applicants, employers want to use as many tools as possible. In addition to testing for particular skills, employers may consider intelligence or personality tests. But these types of tests may be a bad idea: they have questionable benefits and can put the employer in legal hot water. Continue reading

10 Steps to Hiring Without Violating Disability Discrimination Laws

stk205067rkeRegardless of whether a job applicant has an apparent disability, employers should always follow these 10 steps to reduce the risk of liability for running afoul of the anti-discrimination provisions of the ADA or the FEHA. Continue reading

Interviewer’s Loose Lips Can Lead to Employer Liability

interview_80608276Employers need to be very careful what their interviewers say to job applicants. Off the cuff statements like “we have the most competitive salaries” or “the best benefits” and “we assure growth” may be fodder in a suit for misrepresentation. Continue reading

Immigration Issues Dos and Don’ts for Job Interviews

interview_164665580There are many subjects that require care when conducting a job interview. Immigration is definitely one of them. Given the increased awareness and sensitivity to immigration status issues, employers need to watch their questions. Continue reading

Getting into a Job Applicant’s Head

As if the job application and interview process weren’t intense enough, some employers want to get into the applicant’s psyche to make sure he or she has the right psychological makeup for the job. Continue reading

Added Restrictions on Employer Use of Credit Reports Vetoed by Governor, Again

 Governor Schwarzenegger has again vetoed a bill that would have limited employers’ use of credit information on potential employees. As reported in the Morrison & Foerster Client Alert, Assembly Bill 482 “would have dramatically restricted the circumstances under which an employer could use a credit report for pre-employment screening or other employment purposes.” Employees and potential employees can nonetheless take heart in existing protections under the Consumer Credit Reporting Agencies Act (CCRAA) (CC §§1785.1-1785.36). Continue reading

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