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Civil Litigation Discovery Legal Topics

Should You Amend Your Interrogatory Responses?

It’s not required that a party amend interrogatory responses to reflect information the party got after responding, but there are situations in which a party may want to do just that.

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Civil Litigation Discovery Legal Topics

What Constitutes a Good Faith Meet-and-Confer Effort?

Before filing a motion to compel discovery responses, the parties must engage in a “reasonable and good faith attempt at an informal resolution of each issue presented by the motion.” CCP §2016.040. What constitutes a good faith meet-and-confer effort depends on a variety of factors.

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Civil Litigation Discovery Legal Topics Practice of Law

What to Tell Clients When Discovery Starts

starting discovery responsesOnce discovery starts, you’ll need to contact your client to help with responses. Here’s a sample letter to explain what is happening and what you need from your client.

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Civil Litigation Discovery Legal Topics

Checklist: Procedures for Interrogatories

checklist to use for interrogatory proceduresKeep this checklist handy the next time you’re propounding or responding to interrogatories—whether it’s your first time or you’re so familiar with the procedures that you just might accidentally skip something.

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Civil Litigation Discovery Legal Topics

12 Grounds for Objecting to Interrogatories

Interrogatories play a key role in litigation: They’re used to gather potential evidence to support a party’s contentions, including facts, witnesses, and writings, or to determine what contentions an opposing party is planning to make. CCP §2030.010(b). But just because they ask doesn’t mean you have to answer. You can object to interrogatories on many grounds. Here’s a list of objections to keep handy when the next batch of interrogatories arrives.

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Civil Litigation Discovery Legal Topics

Duty to Investigate Before Answering Interrogatories

looking_140478824Before you answer interrogatories, you have a duty to investigate. But what does that mean and how far do you have to go?