These Statements Aren’t Hearsay, Even If Admitted for Their Truth

There are several types of statements that, although sought to be admitted in evidence for their underlying truth, aren’t considered hearsay. This means you can get them into evidence and no hearsay exception need apply. Continue reading

Are You Showing Enough in an Offer of Proof?

attorney making offer of proof to judge at trialWhen the opposing side objects to your evidence or the judge rules your evidence inadmissible, it’s time to make an offer of proof to encourage the court to admit the evidence or reconsider its ruling. Here’s a handy table illustrating how much of a showing is necessary in an offer of proof. Continue reading

What’s a Timely Objection?

clock_92572588Objections to evidence at trial must be “timely made.” Evid C §353(a). But what does that actually mean? Continue reading

The “Opening the Door” Fallacy

200368976-001It is a popular fallacy that if testimony is given on a subject during direct examination, this will “open the door” to unrestricted cross-examination about that matter; making evidence admissible that would otherwise be inadmissible. This is actually only true in certain limited circumstances. Continue reading

Ever Heard of Implied Hearsay?

101771660Most of us think about hearsay in connection with facts that are expressly stated. But an out-of-court statement that’s offered to prove the truth of the facts implied by the statement is also hearsay and inadmissible unless an exception applies. You may not have heard the term implied hearsay, but you’ve likely encountered it. Continue reading