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4 Things Expert Witnesses Should Read Before Trial

In addition to the file materials used in preparing for deposition—and that should be reviewed again for trial—there are at least four types of written materials that every expert witness should carefully read and analyze before testifying at trial. Continue reading

3 Ways to Prove Former Testimony at Trial

There are times you want to offer former testimony against a party to a former proceeding or against a party at the current trial who wasn’t a party to the former proceeding. There’s a hearsay exception for that, and here’s how you use it. Continue reading

How to Prepare a Trial Outline

ThinkstockPhotos-459334539Heading to trial? Start your planning by preparing a trial outline. Here are the key things to include and a sample outline to give you an idea how it looks. Continue reading

4 Steps to Deciding How and When to Present Evidence

Your objective is to determine how and when to present each witness, exhibit, and other item of evidence most persuasively during trial. The key to meeting this objective is breaking it down into these four steps. Continue reading

In Limine Motion Might Be the Perfect Tool for Trump

thinkstockphotos-122406964Trump’s attorneys used a motion in limine to keep what’s been going on with his presidential run away from the jurors in the class action against him related to Trump University. This is just the type of situation a motion in limine is perfect to address. Indeed, the greatest value of in limine motions lies in a party’s ability to confront prejudicial evidence before it’s presented at trial and comes to a jury’s attention. Continue reading

Snapchat as Evidence

snapchat-picSeveral years ago we told you to consider Facebook postings as evidence in legal cases. This is still true, but now there are many more social media platforms to consider. Snapchat in particular has become a fertile source of evidence not to be overlooked. Continue reading

8 Tips for Every Cross-Examination You Do

ThinkstockPhotos-57280447Your approach to cross-examination will vary depending on the “type” of witness being examined, e.g., the hostile witness, the flippant witness, the timid witness, or the sympathetic and truthful witness. But regardless of which type you’re dealing with—which can even change during your examination—there are some universal principles of cross-examination that apply in any situation. Continue reading

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