FAQs on Disqualifying an Attorney

The right of a party to be represented in litigation by the attorney of its choice is significant, and disqualification of that attorney won’t be required just because that attorney has represented the opposing party in the past. Rather, there must be a violation or threatened violation of an ethical rule. Continue reading

Could Your LinkedIn Profile Lead to an Ethics Violation?

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The following is a guest blog post by Los Angeles attorney Eli S. Cohen. Eli handles all civil litigation matters, with specific focus on class action, employment, and real estate law.

Lawyers’ use of LinkedIn and other social media channels is skyrocketing, but beware of the ethical issues lurking there, and take action so that you are not the star of the next ethics opinion. Continue reading

Don’t Check Your Ethics at the Virtual Door

Law firm and solo attorney websites can be effective ways to reach potential clients, but they also carry risks of ethical violations. To avoid these risks, California attorneys should consider both national and state ethics rules (i.e., Cal Rules of Prof Cond 1-400 and Bus & P C §§6157-6159.2) when designing their websites and corresponding with clients or prospective clients online. Continue reading