Your Employees Are Probably Doing It, So Have a BYOD Policy

People today can (and do) work from anywhere—connected through the Internet, WiFi, and cloud-based platforms with a variety of mobile devices. This makes preventing confidential and proprietary business information from “walking out the door,” whether intentionally or not, a nightmare for employers. Having a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy may help. Continue reading

Interviewer’s Loose Lips Can Lead to Employer Liability

interview_80608276Employers need to be very careful what their interviewers say to job applicants. Off the cuff statements like “we have the most competitive salaries” or “the best benefits” and “we assure growth” may be fodder in a suit for misrepresentation. Continue reading

10 Steps to Successful Mediation

10steps_121366302In California, fewer than 5% of civil cases filed actually go to trial. Some actions are dismissed or terminated on motion, but most cases settle. Given this reality, you need to be ready for a successful mediation. Continue reading

An Overall Victory for Employers in Mixed-Motives Cases

The following is a guest blog post by Jeffrey Osofsky, an attorney at Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP in Los Angeles with a practice focusing on defending employers and individual managers against employment-based lawsuits. Mr. Osofsky wishes to thank Munger Tolles Partner Terry Sanchez for his assistance with this post.

stress_160488269California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act generally prohibits employers from basing their employment decisions on certain protected characteristics (race, sex, pregnancy, etc.). But what happens when an employer sued for discrimination can show that, despite any unlawful consideration, it would have reached the same decision about that employee anyway?  Continue reading

Is Weight Discrimination the Next Legal Frontier?

As Corporate Counsel puts it, “[t]he day of weight discrimination as a legal matter is only dawning.” The ramifications of such laws are vast and frightening to employers. Instead of being afraid, employers, and the attorneys who represent them, need to be prepared for likely growth in this area of the law.  Continue reading