4 Tips for Handling Exhibits at Deposition

463413901When it comes to deposition exhibits, you need to keep your eye on the trial: Make sure they are marked, identified, and attached to the deposition transcript. Here are four tips for handling depo exhibits.  Continue reading

Handling Nonverbal Depo Responses

fingersUnless the deposition is video or audio recorded, the record won’t reflect nonverbal responses. This can be a problem if the nonverbal response is material. Here’s how it comes up and how you can deal with it. Continue reading

Snapchat as Evidence

snapchat-picSeveral years ago we told you to consider Facebook postings as evidence in legal cases. This is still true, but now there are many more social media platforms to consider. Snapchat in particular has become a fertile source of evidence not to be overlooked. Continue reading

4 Tips for Contention Interrogatories

ThinkstockPhotos-486765445Interrogatories may be the only discovery procedure that can be used to discover a party’s contentions. You can use them to ask an opponent to state whether he or she makes a particular legal contention, to state the factual basis for the contention, and to identify any witnesses or documents supporting the contention. But before you draft your next set of contention interrogatories, review these four tips. Continue reading

6 Reasons to Use Interrogatories

ThinkstockPhotos-494315642Interrogatories are the discovery workhorse, with at least six major strengths. Consider the following benefits of propounding interrogatories as you plan discovery for your case. Continue reading

Tips for Dealing with a Difficult Deponent

200397990-001If you take depositions, it’s inevitable that you’ll encounter deponents who are difficult to question. In addition to maintaining a professional manner, consider using one or more of the following strategies, based on the difficulty you’re facing. Continue reading

Questions to Ask When Deposing an Expert

ThinkstockPhotos-142081160The task of deposing the opposition’s expert is simplified immeasurably by keeping in mind the deposition’s fundamental purpose: to discover all of the expert’s opinions and all of the bases for those opinions. Your goal should not be to impeach the expert but rather to concentrate on learning everything the expert thinks about the case, has been told or learned about the case, and has done or plans to do in connection with the case. To help reach that goal, here’s a checklist of questions to consider asking when you’re deposing the opposition’s expert. Continue reading

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