Categories
Legal Writing Practice of Law

13 Tips for Creating a Clear Train of Thought

One of the essential qualities of all legal writing, clarity, is created by a clear train of thought. No matter how clear your sentences are, readers will not feel that they add up to a clear message unless they can see how the sentences hang together. It is your job as a writer to bring the reader along with you on your train of thought.

Categories
Legal Writing Litigation Strategy Practice of Law

Writing for the Online Reader

As more courts are requiring or permitting electronic filing (see Cal Rules of Ct 8.212(c)(2)), briefs will be increasingly read online. The ABA Journal reports that even Supreme Court Justices Kagan and Scalia are using electronic readers to read briefs on the go. Because reading documents online differs in some significant ways from reading hard copies, you need to draft your briefs with these differences in mind.

Categories
Legal Writing Litigation Strategy

5 More Creative Writing Techniques for Your Legal Briefs: Drafting a Story

This post is adapted from an article written for CEB by attorney Mary-Christine (“M.C.”) Sungaila.

Using basic storytelling principles from creative writing can inform and improve legal writing. In a recent blog post, we discussed building a brief like building a story, from the characters to the language. In this post, we focus more on drafting the brief, using five more techniques from creative writing.

Categories
Legal Writing Practice of Law

5 Creative Writing Techniques for Your Legal Briefs

This post is adapted from an article written for CEB by attorney Mary-Christine (“M.C.”) Sungaila.

Good writing—whatever its form—is good storytelling.  Although legal briefs have a different purpose than fiction or creative nonfiction, basic storytelling principles from creative writing can inform and improve legal writing. Here are the first five of ten techniques from creative writing that can greatly improve your briefs.