The Hammer Family Law Judges Have When a Party Doesn’t Cooperate

Whether as an emotional response or a strategy, if a party or attorney fails to cooperate in a family law matter it can result in a big hit from the judge. Continue reading

What Experienced Attorneys Know About Relating to Opposing Counsel

The following is a guest blog post by Anabella Q. Bonfa. Ms. Bonfa is a litigator with Wellman & Warren LLP and has built a reputation for handling business and partnership disputes, theft of trade secrets, and unfair competition. She lectures extensively on trade secrets, networking, and using social media to develop business.

In the last year, attorney professionalism has been a hot topic. Courts are issuing sanctions more than ever against attorneys who engage in abusive and inappropriate, or even discourteous, behavior in and out of the court room. Experienced attorneys know the reasons to consider your level of professionalism in law practice—and what it can cost if you don’t. Continue reading

Using Social Media? Beware of Ethical Pitfalls (Part 1)

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The following is a guest blog post by Jonathan Rubens, a principal at Javid Rubens LLP in San Francisco, which represents clients in business transactions and advises them on data security, privacy, trademark and copyright issues.

Attorneys are using social media websites more and more. We’re visiting a variety of sites to promote our practices, communicate with our peers, and stay in touch with our clients. But social media presents many ethical pitfalls to avoid. Here are some tips to help you safely navigate the social media minefield. Continue reading

Don’t Go There in Your Closing

158997762Closing argument gives you a chance to restate the primary issues, summarize the evidence, and explain the law. You’ve got wide latitude in making your closing argument, but don’t let this freedom lull you—there are some things you just can’t say in your closing. Continue reading

Misconduct or Misinterpretation, You Decide

The ABA Journal reports that a Chicago lawyer wants a judge to exclude a buxom woman from the opposing counsel’s table at an upcoming trial because it is claimed that “the sole purpose of her presence at…counsel’s table is to draw the attention of the jury away from the relevant proceedings.” Is this an example of attorney misconduct, or simply the coincidental use of a buxom paralegal assistant?

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