What to Tell the Client When You’re Withdrawing as Counsel

There are many grounds for both mandatory and permissive withdrawal under the California Rules of Professional Conduct. When it’s time to withdraw from representation in a civil case, the attorney should send the client a letter like one of these. Continue reading

How the New Rules of Conduct Affect Your Social Media Use

lawyers using social media to advertiseThe following is a guest blog post by Renee Galente Stackhouse. Renee is the founder and trial lawyer at Stackhouse, APC, where she focuses on plaintiff’s personal injury and military defense in San Diego. She is the immediate past President of California Women Lawyers, President of the CWL Foundation, Chair of the CLA SSF Section, and sits on the Board of the San Diego County Bar Association.

Potential clients and referrals are out there on social media platforms and you can’t afford to ignore them. The new California Rules of Professional Conduct, effective November 1, 2018, take social media realities into account and require changes to the way lawyers use social media. Continue reading

How to Build an Effective Ethical Wall

With attorney movement on the rise between firms, it’s critical that attorneys and firms pay close attention to conflicts of interest that can come up when attorneys in practice for years are integrated into new firms. When a conflict is identified, firms can use ethical walls to prevent breaches of fiduciary duties and big hits to the firm, including disgorgement of attorney fees, malpractice claims, and loss of clients. Continue reading

Got a Website? Tweet? Save Copies of Everything!

135874637Did you know that, if you advertise your legal services on the Internet—and that includes having a firm website or using social media—you have to keep a copy of all the webpages for two years? Continue reading

3 (Selfish) Reasons to Draft Fair Contracts

An attorney drafting an agreement has an obligation to represent the client zealously and to prepare a contract that maximizes the client’s legal and business advantages. But does this mean that an attorney may include provisions that are extremely onerous to the other side? Continue reading

The Perils of an Attorney Joining a Corporate Board

ThinkstockPhotos-185025107From time to time, attorneys are asked to serve as corporate directors or officers. Watch out—there may be some serious perils involved for the attorney and his or her law firm. Continue reading

Tricky Business: Representing Clients with Adverse Interests

470754185As a matter of professional responsibility, California attorneys must avoid conflicts of interest with current and former clients. Beyond these ethical obligations, there are also practical reasons to avoid a new client who is or may be adverse to a current or former client. Continue reading

What to Do If Your Client Dies

You’re litigating a case and your client dies. What do you do? What are your ethical obligations? Continue reading

Do’s and Don’ts of Juror Contact

10tips_22573018Not surprisingly, California’s legal ethics rules have a lot to say about how attorneys relate to jurors. Here are 5 do’s and don’ts when it comes to attorney-juror interaction. Continue reading

Could Your LinkedIn Profile Lead to an Ethics Violation?

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The following is a guest blog post by Los Angeles attorney Eli S. Cohen. Eli handles all civil litigation matters, with specific focus on class action, employment, and real estate law.

Lawyers’ use of LinkedIn and other social media channels is skyrocketing, but beware of the ethical issues lurking there, and take action so that you are not the star of the next ethics opinion. Continue reading