When Your Gut Says Not to Take a Case

You know how you get a “gut feeling” against someone or a situation? This can definitely happen in your law practice. It may be that your personal observations, discussions, or other interactions with a prospective client will lead you to believe that you couldn’t adequately represent the client, or that the client won’t cooperate with you on the matter. When you get that feeling and decide to heed it, here’s how to politely and effectively extricate yourself. Continue reading

The Do’s and Don’ts of Cultivating Clients in the Marijuana Field

thinkstockphotos-597927996The following is a guest blog post by Allison B. Margolin, a partner at Margolin and Lawrence in Los Angeles. Ms. Margolin practices criminal defense and civil litigation in both state and federal court.

California’s new law legalizing recreational marijuana has attracted people from all walks of life to the industry. In turn, this will bring new clients to attorneys. But before you represent clients in marijuana-related businesses, consider these tips. Continue reading

Litigators: Send These 5 Letters to Your Clients

92419672It’s crucial that attorneys maintain regular and open communication with their clients.  When it comes to litigation, communications often come in the form of status report letters. Here are 5 letters that litigators send to their clients and what to include in them. Continue reading

Fee Agreements: Say What You Won’t Be Doing

thinkstockphotos-493171033Many times you can anticipate related services that you don’t intend to provide under the existing fee agreement with the client, but that the client might want provided. Like when you’re retained to negotiate a dispute, but not to litigate it. Or a settlement may have tax consequences for the client, but you won’t be giving tax advice. Be fair to the client and protect yourself by stating any excluded services in your fee agreement. Continue reading

What to Tell Your Client When Litigation Is Over

ThinkstockPhotos-474217181When litigation is over and you’ve completed the representation, here’s what you need to tell your client. Continue reading

What’s Confidential Among Co-Clients?

158997762Whenever you represent multiple clients on the same subject matter, there are confidentiality issues that can come up—and trip you up. Continue reading

Avoid the Overly Emotional Property Dispute Client

170446161A special problem for counsel consulting on neighboring property disputes, particularly those dealing with easements and boundaries, is the intense emotional involvement most clients have in their property. Know the warnings signs of a client whose emotions are going to be a problem, and either don’t take the case or get out fast. Continue reading

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