Protect Clients from Themselves

social_138282233A legal matter may be the most important thing happening in your client’s life, but you have to warn your client to avoid conversations about it on social media. Whatever they say online—no matter how innocently intended—can be found and used to undermine their position. Here are three things to tell clients about online communications. Continue reading

Litigators: Send These 5 Letters to Your Clients

92419672It’s crucial that attorneys maintain regular and open communication with their clients.  When it comes to litigation, communications often come in the form of status report letters. Here are 5 letters that litigators send to their clients and what to include in them. Continue reading

What to Tell Your Client When Litigation Is Over

ThinkstockPhotos-474217181When litigation is over and you’ve completed the representation, here’s what you need to tell your client. Continue reading

What to Tell Your Client When the Court Date’s Set

ThinkstockPhotos-488246600When a date is set for trial or a hearing at which your client needs to appear, don’t just pick up the phone—write your client a letter. This letter has two purposes: it informs your client of the date and it requests that he or she set up an appointment with you to prepare for giving testimony. Here are some suggestions for what to say in your letter. Continue reading

What to Say When a Client Lets You Go

break(great for any design)A client may discharge you at any time and for any reason. When it happens to you, be ready to write a letter to the client confirming that the client wants no further services from you and you won’t be providing them. Actually, you may want to say a bit more than that. Continue reading

5 Ground Rules to Explain to Your New Client

The initial interview with a prospective client is the time to explain the ground rules of the attorney-client relationship. Here are five rules to make sure you cover. Continue reading

Is In-House Counsel Your Attorney?

177237307Here’s the obvious: to invoke the attorney-client privilege, the communication must be made to, or in the presence of, the client’s attorney. But things become murky when you have to decide whether that attorney is actually acting as an attorney when the communication is made—an issue that comes up frequently when dealing with in-house counsel. Continue reading

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