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2 Key Provisions for Your Fee Agreement

In The Contract that Binds: Your Fee Agreement, we noted that fee agreements should not be governed by simple boilerplate and formulaic thinking. This is true, but there are exceptions to this general advice: Here are two particular provisions that should be considered and likely added to every fee agreement you draft. Continue reading

Using Video to Brand Yourself and Connect with Clients

The following is a guest blog post by Nicole Abboud, Esq.  Ms. Abboud is a Millennial speaker, former practicing attorney, producer and host of The Gen Why Lawyer Podcast, and founder at Abboud Media—a video branding and marketing agency for lawyers.

Your potential clients are online, searching for answers to their legal concerns by consuming digital content. Videos are one way they seek answers. In fact, with over 1 billion hours of YouTube videos watched per day and YouTube ranking as the second largest search engine on the web, it’s safe to say that video is a highly effective way of reaching potential clients. Continue reading

Does an Ethical Breach Bar an Attorney from Getting Fees?

The short answer: Yes, under California law, an attorney’s ethical breach of duty may disqualify that attorney from all or part of a fee award. But there’s a possible exception. Continue reading

It’s Time to Review Your Calendaring System

Missed deadlines caused by failure to properly calendar matters are the most significant cause of malpractice claims against attorneys. Without a good docket control system, even the most knowledgeable practitioner may miss a deadline or not have enough time to properly prepare. Is your system up to the task? Continue reading

What to Include in a Fee Agreement for Forming a Corporation

If you represent clients in forming a California corporation, you should have a fee agreement that is specifically tailored for that type of work. Here are the necessary provisions to include. Continue reading

What to Tell Clients About Their Files at the End of the Case

Case files routinely contain documents (and sometimes other property) that clients have provided. The California Rules of Professional Conduct require that an attorney return these items, at a client’s request, when the attorney’s “employment has terminated” (subject to “any protective order or nondisclosure agreement”). Cal Rules of Prof Cond 3–700(D)(1). Here’s sample language that you can use in a letter to a client at the end of the case. Continue reading

When Your Gut Says Not to Take a Case

You know how you get a “gut feeling” against someone or a situation? This can definitely happen in your law practice. It may be that your personal observations, discussions, or other interactions with a prospective client will lead you to believe that you couldn’t adequately represent the client, or that the client won’t cooperate with you on the matter. When you get that feeling and decide to heed it, here’s how to politely and effectively extricate yourself. Continue reading

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