You’re Overworked. Here’s What to Do About It.

The following is a guest blog post by Dina Lynch Eisenberg, Esq., who provides consulting services to help overworked lawyers transform their work and life.

The signs of overwork are subtle and insidious. They sneak up on you. Are you feeling tired, unfocused, dissatisfied, doubtful, annoyed, pain? If you answered yes to a few of these signals, you may want to stop and look for ways to refresh yourself with these methods. Continue reading

Easy Tips for Lawyers to Improve Their Health

The following guest blog post is by Jonathan Jordan (“JJ”), an award-winning Personal Trainer, Nutrition Coach, Group Fitness Instructor and Fitness Blogger. He offers his clients personalized fitness programs and nutritional advice to coach them towards healthier, sustainable lifestyles. 

Many lawyers know they should be taking better care of themselves but don’t have enough time and aren’t sure where to start. Lawyers struggle with long hours spent in client meetings, in court, at computers, and hunched over mobile devices. This all takes a painful toll on their bodies. Here are some of my most impactful, realistic tips, which have helped hundreds of lawyers make small, manageable changes to improve their health. Continue reading

How to Discuss Settlement in Your Fee Agreement

When handling a dispute, make sure that your fee agreement covers settlement. Here’s some sample language to get you started. Continue reading

CEBblog’s Most Popular Posts from 2018

Before we say goodbye to 2018, take a look at some of the most popular posts from the past year. Continue reading

What to Tell the Client When You’re Withdrawing as Counsel

There are many grounds for both mandatory and permissive withdrawal under the California Rules of Professional Conduct. When it’s time to withdraw from representation in a civil case, the attorney should send the client a letter like one of these. Continue reading

How the New Rules of Conduct Affect Your Social Media Use

lawyers using social media to advertiseThe following is a guest blog post by Renee Galente Stackhouse. Renee is the founder and trial lawyer at Stackhouse, APC, where she focuses on plaintiff’s personal injury and military defense in San Diego. She is the immediate past President of California Women Lawyers, President of the CWL Foundation, Chair of the CLA SSF Section, and sits on the Board of the San Diego County Bar Association.

Potential clients and referrals are out there on social media platforms and you can’t afford to ignore them. The new California Rules of Professional Conduct, effective November 1, 2018, take social media realities into account and require changes to the way lawyers use social media. Continue reading

What Experienced Attorneys Know About Relating to Opposing Counsel

The following is a guest blog post by Anabella Q. Bonfa. Ms. Bonfa is a litigator with Wellman & Warren LLP and has built a reputation for handling business and partnership disputes, theft of trade secrets, and unfair competition. She lectures extensively on trade secrets, networking, and using social media to develop business.

In the last year, attorney professionalism has been a hot topic. Courts are issuing sanctions more than ever against attorneys who engage in abusive and inappropriate, or even discourteous, behavior in and out of the court room. Experienced attorneys know the reasons to consider your level of professionalism in law practice—and what it can cost if you don’t. Continue reading

Keeping Your Fee Deposit Topped Up

client should top off fee deposit like a gas tankDo you know how to keep your client’s fee deposit from emptying out as you earn the fees? Here are two ways to do it. Continue reading

Lawyers Must Now Inform Clients about Mediation Confidentiality in Writing

The following is a guest blog post by Teddy (Theda) Snyder. Ms. Snyder is based in Los Angeles and conducts civil and workers compensation mediations throughout California.

Starting January 1, 2019, attorneys must ask clients to acknowledge in writing that they have been fully informed about the rules of mediation confidentiality. SB 954 amends Evidence Code §1122 and adds §1129 (Stats 2018, ch 350). You can create your own form, but you’ll probably use a version of the “safe harbor” form in §1129.

Continue reading