Covering Costs in Contingent Fee Agreements

When you’re working for a contingent fee, i.e., you’ll be paid a percentage of the recovery, don’t forget to discuss the payment of costs in your fee agreement with your client. Here’s what you’ll need to include to be sure you cover costs. Continue reading

Going Solo? Don’t Forget Insurance!

ThinkstockPhotos-460141487One of the first and most important purchases for an attorney opening a new practice is insurance coverage. Here’s a look at what you’ll need. Continue reading

What to Tell Your Client When the Court Date’s Set

ThinkstockPhotos-488246600When a date is set for trial or a hearing at which your client needs to appear, don’t just pick up the phone—write your client a letter. This letter has two purposes: it informs your client of the date and it requests that he or she set up an appointment with you to prepare for giving testimony. Here are some suggestions for what to say in your letter. Continue reading

Read This Before You Go the Contingency Fee Route

ThinkstockPhotos-135547447Among the several alternatives to the traditional hourly fee arrangement, contingency fees have been commonly used for decades. Under a contingent fee agreement, the attorney and client agree that the attorney will receive a particular percentage of the client’s recovery or of the savings obtained for the client as a fee for legal services, if there is a recovery. The attorney takes on the risk with the potential for significant reward. Not surprisingly, there are statutory requirements for these types of agreements—and failing to comply with them is risky, too. Continue reading

What to Say When a Client Lets You Go

break(great for any design)A client may discharge you at any time and for any reason. When it happens to you, be ready to write a letter to the client confirming that the client wants no further services from you and you won’t be providing them. Actually, you may want to say a bit more than that. Continue reading

7 Tips for a Successful Networking Lunch

ThinkstockPhotos-514423654The following is a guest blog post by Anabella Q. Bonfa. Ms. Bonfa is a litigator with Wellman & Warren LLP and has built a reputation for handling business and partnership disputes, theft of trade secrets, and unfair competition. She lectures extensively on trade secrets, networking, and using social media to develop business.

In every lawyer’s career there comes a time when they have to start networking and bringing in clients. This usually involves attending functions, meeting new people, and eventually the dreaded “networking lunch.” The lunch is usually dreaded because new lawyers erroneously think it’s only about selling their law firm and they don’t want to be a salesperson. But that’s really not what it’s about: Here’s a plan for getting through networking lunches in a way that’s easy, rewarding, and, most importantly, involves minimal “sales.”  Continue reading

Need Change? Take Inventory of Your Legal Career

ThinkstockPhotos-477423872The following is a guest blog post by Laura Boysen-Aragon. Ms. Boysen-Aragon is a legal recruiter at Solutus Legal Search, LLC, where she helps lawyers find their next dream job and helps companies and law firms find their next legal ace. She is also a former practicing attorney.

If you’re like many lawyers and feel burnt out or bored, it might be time to take inventory of your career. But taking the time to think about career issues can be daunting—you know you need to make some changes, but where to begin? Start by taking a few minutes to ask yourself some important questions, the answers to which will give you direction and help you find more fulfillment in your career. Continue reading

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