The Key Case Unlocks No Contest Clause Litigation

A recent appellate decision provides a novel rationale for litigating no contest clauses that could be considered unenforceable under current law. Continue reading

Does No Physician Report Mean No Supplemental Job Displacement Benefit?

The following is a guest blog post by Michael W. Sullivan of Michael Sullivan & Associates LLP, an aggressive workers’ compensation defense firm with offices throughout California. Mr. Sullivan is a bar-certified Specialist in Workers’ Compensation Law.

An employee who suffers residual effects from an injury and can’t return to work is entitled to a supplemental job displacement benefit. The benefit comes in the form of a nontransferable voucher, and often is simply referred to as the “voucher.” An employer’s duty to investigate liability for the voucher is triggered by a Physician’s Return to Work & Voucher report (RTW Report). If there’s no RTW Report, does that mean an employer can’t be liable for the voucher? Continue reading

What to Know Before Selling Food Made at Home

The cottage food industry—small batch food production from home—is growing, as are the related laws and regulations. Here’s what those who want to get in on the trend need to know. Continue reading

Are There Consequences to Taking the Fifth in a Workers’ Comp Case?

The following is a guest blog post by Michael W. Sullivan of Michael Sullivan & Associates LLP, an aggressive workers’ compensation defense firm with offices throughout California. Mr. Sullivan is a bar-certified Specialist in Workers’ Compensation Law.

The Fifth Amendment protects a person from answering “official questions in any other proceeding, civil or criminal, formal or informal, where he or she reasonably believes the answers might incriminate him or her in a criminal case.” Spielbauer v County of Santa Clara (2009) 45 C4th 704, 714. This includes workers’ compensation proceedings. But does invoking the Fifth Amendment have any consequences for an injured worker? Continue reading

Is a Wealth Tax Unconstitutional?

A wealth tax proposed by Senator Elizabeth Warren has found favor in certain academic circles, including the University of California, Berkeley. It would be 2 percent of worldwide assets of U.S. citizens and residents in excess of $50 million and 3 percent of assets in excess of $1 billion, in addition to existing income and transfer taxes. It’s claimed this wealth tax would raise an estimated $2.75 trillion in revenue over 10 years. But is it constitutional? Continue reading

When Must Employee Travel Time Be Paid?

The following is a guest blog post by Richard J. Simmons of Sheppard Mullin in Los Angeles. He represents employers in various labor and employment matters.

California law establishes unique rules governing when time spent is compensable “hours worked.” How these rules are applied to travel time is continuing to evolve. Continue reading

DOL’s Proposal for Exempt Employees Doesn’t Meet CA’s Standard

The following is a guest blog post by Richard J. Simmons of Sheppard Mullin in Los Angeles. He represents employers in various labor and employment matters.

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a new salary standard for exempt employees under the federal wage and hour law. But it falls below California’s standard. Continue reading

How Much Tech Knowledge Do You Need to Meet Your Ethical Duty?

A Luddite attorney is not a competent attorney, at least according to the ethical rules. But how much and what type of technology do you need to understand? Continue reading

New Year, New Laws for Business Lawyers

Were you able to keep track of the new legislative changes that affect California businesses and business lawyers? Don’t worry, we did and here are some of the key statutory changes you need to know about. Continue reading