8 Tips for Every Cross-Examination You Do

ThinkstockPhotos-57280447Your approach to cross-examination will vary depending on the “type” of witness being examined, e.g., the hostile witness, the flippant witness, the timid witness, or the sympathetic and truthful witness. But regardless of which type you’re dealing with—which can even change during your examination—there are some universal principles of cross-examination that apply in any situation. Continue reading

What’s a Timely Objection?

clock_92572588Objections to evidence at trial must be “timely made.” Evid C §353(a). But what does that actually mean? Continue reading

6 Tips for Using Technology in Court Presentations

ThinkstockPhotos-498646267If you’re planning to use electronic technology in your court presentations, such as in your opening statement or closing argument, consider these six tips to make your use of technology as effective as possible while avoiding common pitfalls. Continue reading

4 Ways to Attack Expert Testimony

ThinkstockPhotos-502890083You can always object to the opposing expert’s qualifications or the information on which he or she relied, but don’t forget about using these foundational attacks on an expert’s testimony. Continue reading

Voir Dire: Your First Chance to Make a Good Impression

78724287Some attorneys erroneously think of their opening statement as the first opportunity to present themselves to the jury. In reality, the jurors will begin getting an impression of you—and by extension, your case—as soon as you begin voir dire. It’s critical that you use your interpersonal skills to connect with potential jurors as soon as they enter the courtroom for the first time. Continue reading

11 Steps to Introducing Exhibits at Trial

steps_78288477If it’s your first trial or it’s been a while since you’ve tried a case, here’s a handy list of the steps to take when introducing your evidence at trial. Continue reading

Really Listen to the Witness

listen_50736139It sounds obvious: You should always listen carefully to the witness during cross-examination. But listening means more than just hearing the words actually said. Ideally, your listening will go well beyond that, which can make all the difference in improving your cross-examination. Continue reading

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