Using the “Black Box” in a Car Accident Case

One of the key parts of liability testimony in a car accident case is the chronology of the accident: the parties’ conduct before the impact, the impact, and conditions after impact. The parties are most likely to dispute the first part, making the car’s “black box” a potentially helpful source of evidence (but with its own pitfalls). Continue reading

Checklist: What to Include in a Government Claim

Under California’s Government Claims Act (Govt C §§810–996.6), you can’t sue a public entity or its employees until after you’ve presented the entity with a claim for “money or damages.” Here’s a handy checklist of the essential elements to include in a claim. Continue reading

Would an “Insured” by Any Other Name Be as Covered?

thinkstockphotos-618210028Automobile liability policies provide coverage both to “named insureds” and “insureds.” Do you understand the coverage consequences of this distinction? Continue reading

Put a Stop to Your Client’s Illegal Recording Activity

Whether it’s to expose an unfaithful fiancé or set the record straight on a public feud, dictophoneself-appointed vigilantes should think twice before recording a private conversation: it’s against the law. Here’s what to tell your sleuthing client about California’s privacy laws.
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Settling a Car Accident Case: Drafting Your Demand

ThinkstockPhotos-84461514You’re representing someone injured in a car accident and you’ve reached the point at which you’re ready to send a demand letter to communicate a settlement offer to the defendant’s insurance carrier. But what should that letter include? To get you started, here are some sample provisions to include in your letter as well as drafting suggestions. Continue reading

Bound to Arbitrate Nursing Home Litigation?

Senior woman in a nursing homeWhen is a personal representative bound to arbitrate claims against a nursing home? The answer depends on the nature of the claim, as illustrated in a recent case. Continue reading

Supreme Court Paves the Way for Organic Food Fraud Suits

ThinkstockPhotos-493451151The California Supreme Court just handed down a decision that’s been hailed by the Recorder as “boon for plaintiffs bar.” In Quesada v Herb Thyme Farms (PDF), the supreme court unanimously held that claims for fraud by intentionally labeling conventionally grown food as organic aren’t preempted by the federal Organic Foods Act—so it’s a green light for plaintiffs to sue under California’s consumer protection laws and reap the remedies found there. Continue reading

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