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5 Steps to Responding to a Deposition Notice

After receiving a deposition notice or subpoena, counsel should to take a careful look at the documents served and make decisions about how to proceed. To organize the process, follow these five steps. Continue reading

4 Ways to Help Witnesses Maintain Credibility

When it comes to testifying, the first and most fundamental rule is to tell the truth. In addition to the obvious reasons, it’s hard to trick or trap someone who’s telling the truth about everything. But sometimes witnesses are afraid to admit to mistakes or biases and inadvertently appear less than honest.  Continue reading

To Meet and Confer, You Need to Talk

If you have a “dispute concerning discovery,” the law requires that you try to resolve it informally by conferring with the opposing side. This meet-and-confer requirement can be met in person, by telephone, or by letter. But a letter or email alone generally won’t cut it; to really meet and confer, you need to talk to opposing counsel. Continue reading

8 Tips to Maximize Interpreter Effectiveness

Once you find a qualified interpreter, apply these eight tips to maximize the interpreter’s usefulness in court or at trial. Continue reading

Are Insurance Agreements Discoverable?

The existence of insurance is often key to a lawsuit and one of the first orders of business in discovery. There are statutory provisions allowing for discovery of the existence and contents of insurance agreements—as well as limits on it. Continue reading

Before Requesting Discovery, Have a Plan to Enforce It

When starting discovery, your focus is on the specific requests you will make. But don’t forget to have a plan to enforce your discovery efforts. Continue reading

Should You Discuss Damages During Opening and Closing?

thinkstockphotos-465858366Whether and how you discuss damages in your opening statement and closing argument is a strategic consideration. A plaintiff discussing damages in the opening may turn jurors off, but not doing so can be a tactical mistake. Defendants usually want to steer clear of damages in the opening if possible. And both sides should discuss damages in the closing, but maybe in a different order. Continue reading

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