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New Year, New Laws for Civil Litigators

The California legislature has enacted several new laws that may affect your litigation practice. Here are some of the key statutory changes you need to know about. Continue reading

Do You Need a Discovery Referee?

It’s not feasible to stop a deposition every time an attorney or witness becomes obstructive, run to court to have a judge or discovery commissioner resolve the issue, and then resume the deposition. If you anticipate such problems, using a discovery referee may be a solution. Continue reading

How to Prepare for a Hearing on Summary Judgment

A hearing on a motion for summary judgment or summary adjudication presents opportunities you don’t want to miss. Here’s how to prepare for the hearing whether the tentative ruling is in your favor or not, and when there’s no tentative ruling at all. Continue reading

5 Areas for Questioning an Expert at Deposition

Regardless of an expert’s particular specialty, there are five areas that apply to the questioning of most expert witnesses at deposition. Continue reading

Oops! What to Do When Privileged Material Is Inadvertently Produced

In the rush of document production, it’s always possible that privileged material will be inadvertently produced to the opposing party. What happens then? Is the privilege lost? Continue reading

How to Shorten or Extend Time for Your Motion

The timing on making motions is both a procedural and a tactical matter. Sometimes you’ll need a hearing date that’s sooner than would be normally possible, and other times you’ll want to file a notice of motion or get a hearing date that’s after the last date allowed. Here’s how to get the timing to work for you. Continue reading

How to Cross-Examine with Inconsistent Depo Testimony

A witness on the stand has made a statement that’s inconsistent with his or her earlier deposition testimony and has committed to the inconsistency. As the cross-examining attorney, how should you handle it? Continue reading

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