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Checklist: What to Do If Summary Judgment Is Denied

You moved for summary judgment but your motion was denied. Here’s a checklist of four things to ask yourself. Continue reading

This Is How Interrogatories and Depositions Compare

When deciding whether to use interrogatories or depositions in discovery, there are several things to compare. Continue reading

How to Deal with Racial Bias in Court

From the disproportionate incarceration of African-American men to the implicit bias of lawyers, jurors, and judges, Jeff Adachi, Public Defender for the City and County of San Francisco, explains how racial disparities are rampant in our legal system. And then he explains how lawyers can deal with it in court. Continue reading

This Is a Great Way to Organize Your Case

Early and well-thought-out organization of a case is key to getting the best result for your client, whether through summary judgment, settlement, or trial. Not sure how to set up an organizing framework or want to find a better method than your current one? Check out this example and see if it will work for you. Continue reading

How to Handle Improper Coaching at Deposition

One of the common problems at deposition is improper coaching of the deponent by counsel. If you’re the examining attorney, there are three steps you can take to handle this situation. Continue reading

Do You Know When to Use a Subpoena?

A “subpoena” is a writ or an order that compels a witness to either show up and testify or produce something. CCP §1985(a). You can use a subpoena in discovery or in a civil trial or hearing. Here’s a look at which type of subpoena to use in common situations. Continue reading

Using Social Media to Research Prospective Jurors

Given the decreasing time attorneys have for conducting voir dire, it can be very useful to investigate jurors with publicly available background information. Simply running Google searches can reveal an enormous amount of information about a potential juror in a short amount of time. This public information often will come from social media sources. As Ben Hancock reported in his article for Law.com, “social media profiles can present a trove of data points for jury selection…[but] researching jurors online while keeping on the right side of the judge and local ethics rules is hardly a straightforward exercise.”

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