12 Grounds for Objecting to Interrogatories

Interrogatories play a key role in litigation: They’re used to gather potential evidence to support a party’s contentions, including facts, witnesses, and writings, or to determine what contentions an opposing party is planning to make. CCP §2030.010(b). But just because they ask doesn’t mean you have to answer. You can object to interrogatories on many grounds. Here’s a list of objections to keep handy when the next batch of interrogatories arrives. Continue reading

How Far Does a Landowner’s Liability Go?

Couple crossing a street from shopping to the parking lotLandowners’ duty to maintain their premises in a reasonably safe condition has a pretty far reach, but the California Supreme Court recently curbed it. Continue reading

Do Adult Children Have a Duty to Support Their Parents?

multi-generational family photoMost people wouldn’t think twice before helping their parents financially. In fact, partially due to baby boomers’ inadequate retirement planning, 20 percent of surveyed millennials provide financial support to their parents. As Buck Wargo explains in his blog post, most millennials give this help gladly. But they may also be legally required to do so. Continue reading

3 Tips Before Starting a Law Practice

Particularly in solo and small law practices, income growth typically is irregular and for the most part slow in the first year of practice. Before you decide to go solo or join a new practice, do some financial planning and consider these three tips. Continue reading

Should You Object to Compound Questions?

A question to a witness is objectionable on the ground that it’s compound if it joins two or more questions with the disjunctive “or” or the conjunctive “and.” But it may not always make sense to object. Here’s a look at the dangers of compound questions and how to handle them. Continue reading

How to Write an Executive Summary for a Business Plan

business plan notes on tableWhether starting a business or transforming one, it’s important to have a written business plan. A business plan should start with an executive summary that briefly describes the business’s products or services, its market and competition, and its management. The executive summary can make or break a business’s pursuit of investors. Continue reading

5 Steps to Preparing a Deposition Notice

typing out deposition notice on laptopOnce you’ve considered the advantages and disadvantages and have decided to take an oral deposition, you need to draft a written deposition notice. To make sure that you include all the required content, follow these five steps. Continue reading

Can an Employer Require a Lie Detector Test?

man getting hooked up to lie detector machineUnder California law, the answer is “no,” and under federal law it’s “probably not.” But some employers still want to give employees a polygraph, lie detector, or similar test. Continue reading

How to Cover Costs in Your Fee Agreement

money in hand representing costs attorney can recoverIt’s not just attorney fees that you need to discuss in your fee agreement with your client—make sure to cover costs, including whether you’ll advance them. Here are the basics that you need to know, including sample language for your agreement. Continue reading

5 Things to Know Before You Handle an Administrative Action

Many attorneys are unfamiliar with the forum when they find themselves involved in an administrative action. Don’t worry—these tips will help. Continue reading