Could Your LinkedIn Profile Lead to an Ethics Violation?

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The following is a guest blog post by Los Angeles attorney Eli S. Cohen. Eli handles all civil litigation matters, with specific focus on class action, employment, and real estate law.

Lawyers’ use of LinkedIn and other social media channels is skyrocketing, but beware of the ethical issues lurking there, and take action so that you are not the star of the next ethics opinion. Continue reading

Loose Lips Sunk Settlement

slam_90250057In a recent Florida case, the plaintiff lost $80,000 of settlement proceeds he had received on his employment discrimination claim after his daughter spilled the beans on Facebook. Breaching the confidentiality clause in a settlement agreement—and getting caught at it—is frighteningly easy in the age of social media. Continue reading

Watch What You Post: 4 Ways to Protect Your Clients from Themselves

148372802The following is a guest blog post by Scott J. Corwin, founding attorney of the Los Angeles Motor Vehicle Accident Law Firm. For over 20 years, Mr. Corwin has represented more than 2,500 injured victims and has been named a Southern California SuperLawyer for eight years in a row.

These days it seems that everyone is using social media, connecting people in ways never thought possible even ten years ago. In personal injury cases, social media can cause serious damage—we’ve all heard horror stories of people receiving minor settlements after a compromising photo or post was seen on Facebook. As attorneys, we must inform our clients of these potential dangers and help them make informed decisions on the use of social media to protect the integrity of their cases. Continue reading

Blog, But Blog Ethically

The following is a guest blog post by April E. Frisby of Frisby Law. April is a corporate and securities transactional lawyer and an adjunct law professor at Whittier Law School.

104229040Lawyers are often gun-shy when it comes to blogging, in part because of the ethical limits on advertising and solicitation by lawyers. But if you keep ethical considerations in mind, blogging can be a fun, cost-effective way to promote your practice. Continue reading

Employers: Keep Clear of Social Media Landmines, Part 2

socialmedia_158535558Social networking and social media are increasingly incorporated into the workplace, but not without dangerous issues arising. Employers need to be ready to handle issues relating to social networking that occur during both on- and off-duty hours. Continue reading

Employers: Keep Clear of Social Media Landmines, Part 1

socialmedia_158535558Whether employers like it or not, social networking and social media have found their way into most workplaces. Their appearance has meant many potential landmines for employers to navigate. Luckily, there are several relatively easy steps that every employer can take to decrease potential liability. Continue reading

Update Your Social Media Policies

As the National Labor Relations Board continues to refine its position, here’s what you need to know to update your (or your client’s) social media policy. Continue reading

Everything You Tweet Can Be Held Against You!

Judges throughout the country wrestle with the legal ramifications of evolving new technology, including personal information privacy in the use of social media. A New York criminal court recently put a big hole in any privacy expectation on tweets when it upheld a subpoena duces tecum and required Twitter to provide a defendant’s tweets to the district attorney. Continue reading

Social Media Adds a New Twist to PreTrial Publicity Ethical Issues

Updated on 10/31/12: The ABA Journal reports that the judge refused to issue a gag order to bar comments and blogging by George Zimmerman’s defense lawyer, finding no “overriding pattern of prejudicial commentary” and that an impartial jury could still be seated.

In an admittedly unusual move, the defense team for George Zimmerman, the man charged with murdering Trayvon Martin, has launched a new website, Facebook, and Twitter account to “disput[e] misinformation,” “discourag[e] speculation,” and provide “a voice for Mr. Zimmerman.” The website also seeks donations for Zimmerman’s defense fund. Is this new route for defense counsel a risky maneuver? How would California’s legal ethics rules weigh in? Continue reading

Service Via Social Networking?

Serving a complaint via Facebook may be in our future. As BusinessWeek.com reports, the practice of online legal service is spreading around the world as courts look for new ways to keep their dockets moving. Continue reading

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