Thinking Ahead: Pre-Birth Custody and Visitation

91584560When parents aren’t living together as a child’s birth approaches, the family may benefit from having pre-birth orders spelling out what will happen at the hospital and beyond. Continue reading

Danger Ahead: 7 Child Custody Clients to Avoid

For each attorney, there are many cases that he or she ought to turn down. One reason to decline a case is a client that is likely to be nothing but trouble for you. Continue reading

A View from the Family Law Bench, Part 2

In the first part of this blog post, we presented 5 tips from retired family law judge and CEB author Hon. Frederick A. Mandabach to help practitioners best approach family law hearings and trials. Here are 5 more inside tips from the judge. Continue reading

A View from the Family Law Bench, Part 1

In California family law cases, it’s a judge—not a jury—that will decide your case. To help you hone your approach to handling family law hearings and trials,  here are the first 5 of 10 inside tips from retired family law judge and CEB author Hon. Frederick A. Mandabach. Continue reading

So How Is this Custody Arrangement Going to Work? 4 Things to Go into Any Joint Custody Order

Despite the publicity surrounding very contentious custody battles, many divorcing couples with children end up with  a court order for joint physical custody and have to figure out the details of sharing time with their kids. As with most things, it helps to get it all spelled out in advance — and in the custody order. Continue reading

Ex-Etiquette

The transition from an intimate partnership in which the parents share a personal relationship to the more distant co-parent relationship is difficult for many people to manage. Despite its prevalence—consider the many Hollywood co-parenting scenarios—there are few social norms and cues to help parents who are living apart. The difficulty is compounded because often each parent has different preferences and expectations for co-parenting.   Continue reading

Treaty Trumps Parental Rights

The U.S. Supreme Court has held that an order prohibiting the removal of a child from a country without the noncustodial parent’s consent is enforceable under an international child abduction treaty. As reported by the National Law Journal, this decision is noteworthy for both its substance and because the justices used foreign law decisions to interpret U.S. treaties and the laws implementing them. Continue reading

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