Direct Examination Crisis Control

57277978Sometimes, despite careful preparation by counsel and the witnesses, direct examination unravels. But if you’ve reviewed these crisis control techniques, you’ll be ready when a problem presents itself during your direct. Continue reading

Are Two (or More) Experts Better Than One?

sb10063567v-001Should you hire multiple experts on the same topic? There are some very good reasons to use this strategy. Continue reading

Calming a Client Before Cross

469790631For many people—especially avid courtroom drama watchers—the anticipation of being cross-examined is terrifying. If your client is one of these people, try these calming techniques. Continue reading

Do’s and Don’ts of Juror Contact

10tips_22573018Not surprisingly, California’s legal ethics rules have a lot to say about how attorneys relate to jurors. Here are 5 do’s and don’ts when it comes to attorney-juror interaction. Continue reading

Make Your Opening and Closing Memorable: 4 Memorizing Tips

474693389If you’ve devoted years to a case and have prepared intensively for trial, you’ve probably memorized all the relevant data so you won’t need to refer to notes for your opening statement and closing arguments. At least you hope so! Going off notes is key to capturing and holding the jury’s attention. If you can memorize what you want to say, the jury will more likely remember what you did say. Continue reading

Order Your Witnesses for Impact

witness_78724356A trial should be like any well-choreographed event: strategically order your witnesses for maximum impact. Continue reading

Know Trial Objections Cold

185468074Making objections is a key skill for every trial attorney. The more you try cases, the more rote they become. But if you’re relatively new to the courtroom, or it’s been a while since you’ve been there, here’s a system for memorizing possible objections and having them at the tip of your tongue at trial. Continue reading

Don’t Irritate the Jury

 

85449976 Your carefully planned cross-examination will be worthless if you manage to irritate the jury. Keep in mind that the jury often focuses more on counsel than the witness. Before your next cross-examination, check out these common irritants and how to avoid them. Continue reading

Refreshing Recollection in Court

469708075It’s common for witnesses forget facts while testifying—often due to nerves and sometimes due to selective memory. The good news is that you can use almost any item to refresh a witness’s recollection. Continue reading

Don’t Let Your Argument Get Personal

arbitration_104240128Although the permissible scope of counsel’s discussion and argument before a jury is broad, personal attacks on opposing parties or their counsel is never ok. Doing so opens you up to successful objections, makes you look like a jerk to the jury, and may lead to you losing your case. Continue reading

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