2 Reasons to Go for Defendant’s Default

ThinkstockPhotos-158687666A default occurs when a defendant served with a complaint doesn’t file the appropriate response within the time allowed. CCP §§585–586. After a defendant is in default, a plaintiff may file a request for entry of default and then apply for a default judgment. Here are two practical reasons to seek entry of default and default judgment. Continue reading

Prepare for Case Management Conferences in 4 Steps

ThinkstockPhotos-477805217In the past, most California superior courts routinely held trial-setting, pretrial, arbitration status, and status conferences. Delay reduction rules put a stop to this practice, consolidating all of these into a comprehensive conference that occurs in the first 180 days after the complaint is filed. Cal Rules of Ct 3.721. And woe to any attorney who comes to the conference unprepared! Take some of the stress out of preparing for your next case management conference by using these four steps. Continue reading

Phone It In: How to Appear by Telephone

ThinkstockPhotos-101720876Want to avoid traffic, parking, and court security checkpoints? Appear at a hearing by telephone! Continue reading

Take 5 (Steps) Before Moving for Summary Judgment

five_108523216Thinking of filing a summary judgment motion in your case? Take the time to follow these five steps in assessing whether this is the right move to make. Continue reading

Checklist for Summary Judgment Reply Brief

ThinkstockPhotos-459334539You moved for summary judgment, received the opposition papers, and now it’s your turn to reply. The reply brief gives you a chance to respond to arguments raised by the opposition. Who knows? The opposition may have misconstrued legal authority, relied on inadmissible evidence, emphasized immaterial facts, or failed to follow the correct procedure. Before you start on your reply, review this checklist. Continue reading

How Can Someone Be Deposed Twice in the Same Case?

ThinkstockPhotos-501707257Generally, you can’t compel someone to attend a deposition if he or she has been previously deposed in the same case. But there are 5 exceptions to this rule. Continue reading

Size Up Your Adversary

ThinkstockPhotos-494299501When it comes to litigating a case, your client’s objectives are only half the story. If you want to gain an advantage, you’ll also need to successfully assess your adversary’s goals, capabilities, and willingness to fight. Continue reading

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