They Know Computers But Not How to Help Your Case

183145432When corporate goes criminal, i.e., an investigation involving a corporation leads to a criminal case headed to trial, you often need computer forensic experts to testify about the evidence. Such experts know all about electronic devices and data storage and retrieval, but they don’t necessarily know how to clearly relay that knowledge. It’s up to you to prepare your computer forensics expert to testify effectively. Continue reading

Should You Make an In Limine Motion?

procon_153899206The next time you’re deciding between excluding evidence via a motion in limine or taking your chances at trial, make sure to review this chart of the pros and cons of motions in limine. Continue reading

Like Steve Jobs, Unavailable Witnesses Can Still “Appear” at Trial

451334569In the trial of an antitrust case against Apple, Steve Jobs will come back to life as a key witness—if only in the form of his videorecorded deposition. Continue reading

Getting Edited Video into Evidence

458909277With court time and patience at a premium, it may be best to introduce an edited version of a video recording into evidence instead of the whole—possible very long—version. But before you do this, you’ll have to authenticate your truncated video. Continue reading

How to Use Technology for Effective Cross-Examination

presentationAA049409The following is a guest blog post by Jeff Bennion, a solo practitioner in San Diego who specializes in personal injury and consulting on e-discovery and litigation technology.

A good cross-examination should come off as scripted. California Evidence Code §767(a)(2) allows for leading questions on cross-examination, and a good trial attorney should lead the witness through the narrative using only questions that he or she knows the answer to. But things don’t always go according to plan. When a witness gives an answer that you did not expect or that is contrary to what you learned in discovery, you need to have a plan for showing your impeachment evidence to the jury. Continue reading

Be Ready to Oppose Motions in Limine

474538053In limine motions are a great litigation tool—they get evidence admitted or excluded before it’s even offered. You’ve probably been advised to use them whenever appropriate. But opposing counsel also will have received this advice and will use them against you. Here’s how to respond to opposing counsel’s in limine motion. Continue reading

Ever Heard of Implied Hearsay?

101771660Most of us think about hearsay in connection with facts that are expressly stated. But an out-of-court statement that’s offered to prove the truth of the facts implied by the statement is also hearsay and inadmissible unless an exception applies. You may not have heard the term implied hearsay, but you’ve likely encountered it. Continue reading

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