The Green Rush: Can City Regulations Keep Up?

MedicalMarijuanaMedallionThe Los Angeles Times calls it “The Green Rush,” referring to the newly-lucrative cultivation of premium marijuana to serve the “discriminating consumers who frequent medical cannabis dispensaries.”  California laws permitting medical marijuana have spawned an industry that has moved from remote, clandestine locations to our city centers. But what’s become a boom for growers and sellers is causing a headache for many city regulators. Continue reading

Everything You Tweet Can Be Held Against You!

Judges throughout the country wrestle with the legal ramifications of evolving new technology, including personal information privacy in the use of social media. A New York criminal court recently put a big hole in any privacy expectation on tweets when it upheld a subpoena duces tecum and required Twitter to provide a defendant’s tweets to the district attorney. Continue reading

Privacy for Your Guilty Viewing Pleasures

This post goes under the category of “good to know.” It’s probably not something most of us are concerned about, but it’s still comforting to know that the law protects the privacy of our video preferences. Continue reading

Cyber-Slamming

The seemingly anonymous world of the Internet leads many of us to say things there that we would never say in person. But watch out, libel laws follow you into cyberspace. Continue reading

Was BART’s Cutting Cell Service a Violation of Free Speech?

For what seems to be the first time in the United States, a government agency cut off mobile-internet and phone service to quash a protest demonstration.  Was this a valid and reasonable way to protect public safety or an unlawful infringement on free speech rights protected under the First Amendment? Continue reading

City Council Meetings Begin with the Lord’s Prayer and End Up with a Lawsuit

The Sussex County Council in Delaware begins each public meeting with the Lord’s Prayer, and has now ended up with a lawsuit (.pdf) for violation of the separation of church and state. Continue reading

Supreme Court Waters Down Stream of Commerce Theory

The following is a guest blog post by Myanna Dellinger, a law professor at Western State University College of Law.

In a world marked by increased ease of conducting international business, you might think that it would also be getting easier to sue foreign corporations in American courts. Think again! In two new opinions, the United States Supreme Court shows just how hard it is to sue foreign corporations in the United States. Continue reading

Profile in Practice: Mitchell E. Abbott

As part of CEB’s commitment to bringing together California’s legal community, our blog will post a short interview with one of your fellow attorneys.

This week, we profile Mitch Abbott:

CEB: What is your practice area and how did you choose it?

Mitch: I specialize in handling writs and appeals (mostly in the state courts) on behalf of cities and other public agencies.  The cases I handle include election disputes, complaints of non-compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), “takings” claims in the context of local land use regulation, challenges to local taxes, assessments and bonds, and constitutional challenges to city ordinances in a wide variety of settings — from billboards to newsracks, and from juvenile curfews to regulation of adult-oriented businesses. Continue reading

The Right to Tattoo

In a decision that conflicts with those of at least six other cases from various jurisdictions, the Ninth Circuit, as Law.com puts it, “had no trouble deeming tattoos and the business of tattoo parlors forms of pure expression fully protected by the First Amendment.” Continue reading

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