Checklist for Summary Judgment Reply Brief

ThinkstockPhotos-459334539You moved for summary judgment, received the opposition papers, and now it’s your turn to reply. The reply brief gives you a chance to respond to arguments raised by the opposition. Who knows? The opposition may have misconstrued legal authority, relied on inadmissible evidence, emphasized immaterial facts, or failed to follow the correct procedure. Before you start on your reply, review this checklist. Continue reading

Drone Law (or the Lack Thereof)

ThinkstockPhotos-452549881This following is a guest blog post by George M. Moore, PhD, JD, a Scientist-in-Residence at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, California, where his course in Drones and Surveillance considers both the technical and legal aspects of drone use and its impact on privacy issues. Dr. Moore is a member of the California and Colorado state bars.

The crashing of a drone on the White House grounds among other recent incidents have shown that drones may pose direct threats to our security, but perhaps a greater long-term threat of drones is to our privacy. A collision between safety, security, privacy rights, and commercial utility is about to happen, and the legal community needs to be prepared to recognize and address the issues that will surely arise. Continue reading

How Can Someone Be Deposed Twice in the Same Case?

ThinkstockPhotos-501707257Generally, you can’t compel someone to attend a deposition if he or she has been previously deposed in the same case. But there are 5 exceptions to this rule. Continue reading

When Trespasser Becomes Plaintiff

ThinkstockPhotos-122406155The family of a 9-year-old California boy who survived a fall through a school’s skylight reportedly claims the school district should be held liable for his injuries because it was too easy to get on the school’s roof and district leaders knew children climbed up there but didn’t do enough to stop it. Property owners beware: A foreseeable risk can turn a trespassing child into a plaintiff. Continue reading

Make Your Argument, But Don’t Argue with the Judge

ThinkstockPhotos-57277848An an attorney and an officer of the court, you sometimes have competing duties: to represent your clients zealously and to maintain respect for the court. When it comes to a disagreeable court ruling, you’ll need to make your strongest argument while remaining respectful to the judge. The key is to argue without arguing. Continue reading

7 Contract Damages Provisions to Bargain Over

break(great for any design)When you’re negotiating and drafting a contract, your client may be excited and focused on the positives, but you have to keep your eye on the dark side, i.e., the consequences of a breach. Consider bargaining over favorable damages provisions—just in case. Continue reading

Size Up Your Adversary

ThinkstockPhotos-494299501When it comes to litigating a case, your client’s objectives are only half the story. If you want to gain an advantage, you’ll also need to successfully assess your adversary’s goals, capabilities, and willingness to fight. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: